Blog Archives

Could DNA testing help the most seriously affected Covid-19 patients?

April 28, 2020 – Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The disease was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, the capital of China’s Hubei province,

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Heart disease prediction by traditional risk factors as good as with an exhaustive genetic test

February 20, 2020 – Traditional cardiovascular risk factors often assessed in an annual physical, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels, diabetes, and smoking status, may at least be as valuable in predicting who will develop coronary heart disease (CHD) as a sophisticated genetic test that surveys millions of different points in DNA,

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Clinical evidence and implementation challenges for pharmacogenomic testing

September 18, 2019 – This post is an edited version of parts of a paper that appeared in the Journal of Personalised Medicine (JPM) a week ago und which addresses one of the important topics in connection with the themes of personalised medicine,

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Combined hormonal contraception: Is there an unacceptable health risk?

January 15, 2019 – The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies combined hormonal contraception as an unacceptable health risk in the presence of a known thrombogenic mutation but advises against routine thrombophilia genetic testing before initiating combined oral contraceptives (COC’s) on the grounds of high screening costs and low prevalence.

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Is genetic testing of value for ALS patients?

January 19, 2018 – Patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) find value in genetic testing for the disease, whether or not they have a family history of the condition, according to findings from a survey conducted by U.S. researchers, just published in the November 2017 issue of Molecular Genetics &

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Genetics Startup 23andMe takes Step on Path to FDA Approval

June 25, 2014 -The genetics startup 23andMe said on Friday it is one step closer to resuming sales of its full-fledged health product, with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration accepting its first health report for review.

The home genetics company said in a blog post that the FDA will begin evaluating the company’s submission for a 510(k) application,

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FDA Drug Safety Communication: Reduced effectiveness of Clopidogrel [Plavix] in patients who are poor metabolizers (i.e. carriers of selected CYP2C19 allelic variants) of the drug

March 17, 2010 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has added a Boxed Warning to the label for Clopidogrel [Plavix], the anti-blood clotting medication. The Boxed Warning is about patients who do not effectively metabolize the drug (i.e. “poor metabolizers”, see below) and therefore may not receive the full benefits of the drug.

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  • Artificial RNA editing with ADAR for gene therapy July 9, 2020
    Many of the diseases caused by point mutations have no established therapeutic approaches. Prof. Tsukahara and colleagues (Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) are studying a therapeutic method using artificial RNA editing. Artificial site-directed RNA editing is an important technique for modifying genes and ultimately regulating protein function. We are trying to modify the […]
  • Amygdala changes in male patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder July 9, 2020
    Researchers at Kumamoto University, Japan have revealed that DNA methylation occurs in the gene that codes serotonin transporter (SERT), a protein that regulates neurotransmitter transmission, in schizophrenia and bipolar patients. Particularly prominent in males and patients with certain genetic polymorphisms, this methylation is inversely correlated with volume of the amygdala in the brain. This work […]
  • Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes July 9, 2020
    In a recent study of genes involved in brain functioning, their previously unknown features have been uncovered by bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS. The findings are reported in PLOS One.
  • Major cause of rare genetic mitochondrial disease identified July 9, 2020
    A cutting-edge study from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) has given hope to families of children born with a fatal heart muscle disease caused by faulty cell machinery.
  • Spatial mapping method pinpoints potential new therapeutic targets in lupus July 8, 2020
    A team of researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used a new method of pinpointing potential disease-causing changes in the genome to identify two new potential therapeutic targets for lupus, while also paving the way for more accurately identifying disease-causing variations in other autoimmune disorders. The findings were published online in Nature Communications.
  • Jurassic fossils from northeastern China reveal morphological stasis in the catkin-yew July 11, 2020
    Dong and colleagues studied well-preserved plant fossils from the Middle-Late Jurassic Daohugou Bed in eastern Inner Mongolia, northeastern China. These fossils closely resemble the extant catkin-yews Amentotaxus. They provide unequivocal evidence that the catkin-yews have undergone little morphological change over at least ~160 million years. Like ginkgo, the catkin-yews are living fossils that provide an […]
  • Largest study of prostate cancer genomics in Black Americans ids targets for therapies July 10, 2020
    Black men in the United States are known to suffer disproportionately from prostate cancer, but few studies have investigated whether genetic differences in prostate tumors could have anything to do with these health disparities. Now, in the largest study of its kind to date, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), UC San Francisco […]
  • Liquid metal synthesis for better piezoelectrics: Atomically-thin tin-monosulfide July 10, 2020
    An RMIT-UNSW collaboration applies liquid-metal synthesis to piezoelectrics, advancing future flexible, wearable electronics, and biosensors drawing their power from the body's movements.Piezoelectric materials such as atomically-thin tin-monosulfide (SnS) convert mechanical forces or movement into electrical energy. Along with their inherent flexibility, this makes them candidates for flexible nanogenerators in wearable electronics or internal, self-powered biosensors.
  • Mom and baby share 'good bacteria' through breast milk July 10, 2020
    A new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia and the University of Manitoba has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process.
  • Alaskan volcano linked to mysterious period with extreme climate in ancient Rome July 10, 2020
    The cold, famine and unrest in ancient Rome and Egypt after the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE has long been shrouded in mystery. Now, an international team, including researchers from the University of Copenhagen, has found evidence suggesting that the megaeruption of an Alaskan volcano may be to blame.
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