Blog Archives

Lemtrada: Deleterious unwanted effects in some multiple sclerosis patients

19 April 2019 – Alemtuzumab (Lemtrada) is used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Moreover, Alemtuzumab, under the Tradenames of Campt, MabCampath and Campt-1H is on the markets for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL),

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Living theragenomic medicine: Direct to consumer test for metabolism of drugs FDA approved

November 08, 2018 –  The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just authorized the first direct-to-consumer test for detecting genetic variants in genes that may govern the metabolism of drugs in individual patients.

Thus, FDA permits marketing, with special controls,

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Lutetium 177 dotatate (Lutathera): A treatment for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs)

January 29, 2018 – Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET)s are a rare group of cancers with limited treatment options that affects primarily the pancreas or gastrointestinal tract of patients.  

The American Food &

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X-linked Hypophosphatemia: Burosumab (Crysvita) to the rescue

 December 16, 2017 – As recent as of December 14, 2017, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has adopted a positive opinion, recommending the granting of a conditional marketing authorisation for the medicinal product Burosumab (Crysvita),

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Besponsa: Is this really a viable new treatment for ALL?

August 18, 2017 – B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a aggressive and rapidly progressing type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many B-cell lymphocytes, an immature type of white blood cell. In the United States, the National Cancer Institute estimates that approximately 5,970 people will be diagnosed with B-cell ALL this year and approximately 1,440 will die from the disease.

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Rare diseases: EU and US collaborate to boost development of therapies

September 30, 2016 – This is very good news for patients suffering from any form of a rare disease. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have engaged in a joint effort to boost development of medicines for rare diseases.

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Palbociclib (Ibrance): New treatment for advanced or metastatic breast cancer in the EU

 September 17, 2016 – Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, with nearly 1.7 million new cases diagnosed in 2012. In Europe, there were an estimated 464,000 new cases of breast cancer in 2012 and an estimated 131,000 deaths from the disease. Hormone receptor positive breast cancer accounts for 65% of tumours in women aged 35 to 65 years and 82% of tumours in women older than 65 years.

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Patient safety: EMA recommends suspension of medicines over flawed studies

August 08, 2016 –The following publication has just been released by the EMA. Because Thasso Post is not only about theragenomic and personalized medicine, but also about the safety of medicines for each individual patient, thasso feels that this is important information which highlights the degree of scrutiny applied by authorities in the quest to guarantee the quality and safety of approved medicines.

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With Infliximab (Flixabi), a huge biosimilar medicine has been approved in the European Union (EU)

 June 22, 2016 – The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has approved, as of the end of May 2016, Infliximab (Flixabi). Infliximab (Flixabi) is a monoclonal antibody that has been designed to attach to a protein called tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and block its activity.

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Are first-in-man (FIM) clinical trials unsafe?

June 01, 2016 – Are first-in-man (FIM) clinical trials unsafe? This question can certainly be answered with no, first-in-man (FIM) clinical trials (clinical Phase I studies) are generally not unsafe. In spite of this notion, and in the wake of the tragic incident which took place during a Phase I first-in-man (FIM) clinical trial in Rennes,

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  • Researchers develop new approach to study the genetics of human disease July 7, 2020
    Many heritable immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and blood-cell related traits derive from critical proteins not being made or not functioning correctly. But exactly how a person's genes, the regulation of these genes and how the resulting proteins interact to cause disease is not widely understood.
  • Common inherited genetic variant identified as frequent cause of deafness in adults July 6, 2020
    A common inherited genetic variant is a frequent cause of deafness in adults, meaning that many thousands of people are potentially at risk, reveals research published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics.
  • Rsearchers create an analytic tool that opens a new frontier of cancer discovery July 6, 2020
    Gene coding regions constitute 2% of the human genome. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a computational tool to identify alterations that drive tumor formation in the remaining 98% of the genome. The method will aid discovery of oncogenes and advances in precision medicine for children and adults with cancer.
  • Discovery of new disease-susceptibility gene for steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome July 3, 2020
    An international research collaboration, including Professor Iijima Kazumoto et al. (of the Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) has revealed that NPHS1 is a disease-susceptibility gene for steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome in children. The NPHS1 gene encodes nephrin, a component protein for the renal glomerulus slit diaphragm, which prevents protein from being passed […]
  • How digital tools can advance quality and equity in genomic medicine July 3, 2020
    The pandemic has forced health care providers to find new ways to connect with patients through screens. For genetic specialists, who provide patients and families with genetic testing for conditions linked to DNA, connecting with patients is an important part of helping them make informed medical decisions.
  • A novel therapeutic target for recovery after stroke July 7, 2020
    IBS researchers have discovered a new mechanism to explain the effects of subcortical strokes and a new possible therapeutic approach.
  • Scientists create new device to light up the way for quantum technologies July 7, 2020
    Researchers at CRANN and the School of Physics at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, have created an innovative new device that will emit single particles of light, or photons, from quantum dots that are the key to practical quantum computers, quantum communications, and other quantum devices.
  • Long-acting injectable form of HIV prevention outperforms daily pill in NIH study July 7, 2020
    A pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) regimen containing an investigational long-acting form of the HIV drug cabotegravir injected once every 8 weeks was more effective than daily oral Truvada at preventing HIV acquisition among cisgender men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men in a clinical trial sponsored by NIH. Findings […]
  • Portable system boosts laser precision, at room temperature July 7, 2020
    Physicists at MIT have designed a quantum "light squeezer" that reduces quantum noise in an incoming laser beam by 15 percent. It is the first system of its kind to work at room temperature, making it amenable to a compact, portable setup that may be added to high-precision experiments to improve laser measurements where quantum […]
  • Fighting E. coli with E. coli July 7, 2020
    According to findings published this week in mBio, Nissle, a strain of Escherichia coli, is harmless to intestinal tissue and may protect the gut from enterohemorrhagic E. coli, a pathogen that produces Shiga toxin.
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