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Study looks at genetic background of healthy people who develop severe Covid-19 illness

June 13, 2020 – To help disentangle the secrets of Covid-19 disease, researchers are sequencing the DNA of young grown-ups and children who suffer from extreme Covid-19 disease ailments in spite of having no hidden clinical issues. The scientists are searching for hereditary genetic risk factors that could put certain people at high danger of getting seriously sick from the novel coronavirus,

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Abdominal aortic aneurysm: Genetic scoring can identify more men at risk

May 07, 2020 – Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a localized enlargement of the abdominal aorta such that the diameter is greater than 3 cm or more than 50% larger than normal. AAAs usually cause no symptoms, except during rupture. 

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Could DNA testing help the most seriously affected Covid-19 patients?

April 28, 2020 – Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The disease was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, the capital of China’s Hubei province,

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Klotho’s role in some patients with Alzheimer’s disease revealed?

April 24, 2020 – The klotho gene is named after the fanciful Greek goddess of destiny Clotho who turns the string of life known to be related with longer life and improved cognizance. In modern biology, allelic variants of the klotho gene in fact have been associated with long life span.

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Inherited mutation in ELP1 predisposes children to medulloblastoma

April 03, 2020 – Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Medulloblastomas are invasive, rapidly growing tumors that, unlike most brain tumors, spread through the cerebrospinal fluid and frequently metastasize to different locations along the surface of the brain and spinal cord. 

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Are Asians at higher genetic risk of serious adverse events to common medications?

March 10, 2020 – A widespread assumption is, the people of Asian descent are more prone to serious, sometimes deadly adverse drug reactions, even when taking rather common medications prescribed for gout through to depression. In the ages of genetics and precision medicine, the question then comes up if Asian people could be at such heightened risk because of underlying particular genetic factors.

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Large genetic map of psychiatric disorders completed

March 15, 2020 –  An international study published in the journal Cell has described 109 genetic variants associated with eight psychiatric disorders such as autism, ADHD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome in a total of about 230,000 patients worldwide.  

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HSD3B1 Genotype Predicts Prostate Cancer Outcomes

February 28, 2020 – A very recent report elucidates the possible prospective power of the knowledge about the genetic background of patients when concerned with certain clinical endpoints (disease states) and associated genes.

The researchers in the present study analyzed outcomes in white men enrolled in the E3805 CHAARTED clinical trial according to HSD3B1 genotype,

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Genetic variants of the NUDT15 gene drive toxicity in leukemia therapy

February 27, 2020 – Thiopurines are important antimetabolite drugs, which make up a critical part of curative treatment for ALL. Genetic variations can directly influence drug and effectiveness of thiopurines. Researchers at St. Jude and elsewhere previously identified NUDT15 variants as a major genetic cause of toxicity during thiopurine therapy,

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Heart disease prediction by traditional risk factors as good as with an exhaustive genetic test

February 20, 2020 – Traditional cardiovascular risk factors often assessed in an annual physical, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels, diabetes, and smoking status, may at least be as valuable in predicting who will develop coronary heart disease (CHD) as a sophisticated genetic test that surveys millions of different points in DNA,

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  • Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals details about individual cells in pancreatic tumors September 30, 2020
    Led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and by HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute, an international team of researchers have described in detail the individual cells that comprise the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, a critical step in devising new treatment options for patients with this aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease.
  • Study: Neanderthal genes are a liability for COVID patients September 30, 2020
    Scientists say genes that some people have inherited from their Neanderthal ancestors may increase their likelihood of suffering severe forms of COVID-19.
  • Concealed cardiomyopathies revealed in cardiac arrest survivors September 30, 2020
    Centenary Institute researchers have discovered that genetic testing can identify "concealed cardiomyopathies" in nearly a quarter of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survivors who seem to have a normal heart.
  • Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain September 29, 2020
    Some people are at higher risk of developing obesity because they possess genetic variants that affect how the brain processes sensory information and regulates feeding and behavior. The findings from scientists at the University of Copenhagen support a growing body of evidence that obesity is a disease whose roots are in the brain.
  • Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk September 29, 2020
    A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found.
  • Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals details about individual cells in pancreatic tumors September 30, 2020
    Led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and by HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute, an international team of researchers have described in detail the individual cells that comprise the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, a critical step in devising new treatment options for patients with this aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease. […]
  • Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities September 30, 2020
    A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification.
  • Videos most effective in communicating with parents about secondhand smoke risks September 30, 2020
    The best way to communicate with parent smokers about the risks of secondhand smoke to their children is to use videos depicting the risks, as well as solutions to reduce those risks.
  • Antipsychotics for treating adult depression linked with higher mortality September 30, 2020
    Rutgers researchers, together with colleagues at Columbia University, have reported an increased mortality risk in adults with depression who initiated augmentation with newer antipsychotic medications compared to a control group that initiated augmentation with a second antidepressant.
  • Is it time to reframe the assisted dying debate? September 30, 2020
    Several articles published by The BMJ today explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives.
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