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Study looks at genetic background of healthy people who develop severe Covid-19 illness

June 13, 2020 – To help disentangle the secrets of Covid-19 disease, researchers are sequencing the DNA of young grown-ups and children who suffer from extreme Covid-19 disease ailments in spite of having no hidden clinical issues. The scientists are searching for hereditary genetic risk factors that could put certain people at high danger of getting seriously sick from the novel coronavirus,

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Host factors may influence Covid-19 severity more than viral genetic variation

May 22, 2020 – Host factors (i.e., disease phenotypes and/or predispositions) instead of viral genetic variation seem to impact more on sickness severity among Covid-19 patients, as indicated by an investigation from China. Scientists in Shanghai analyzed clinical, atomic, and immunological information from in excess of 300 individuals with affirmed Covid-19.

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Besides the now approved remdesivir: Emerging options to treat Covid-19

May 03, 2020 –  The world is desperate in the search for a treatment or better yet a vaccine in the Covid-19 pandemic. Slowly, there are some options emerging at least for the treatment of seriously ill Covid-19 patients. First of all,  the American Food and Drug Administration just issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the investigational antiviral drug remdesivir for the treatment of suspected or laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in adults and children hospitalized with severe disease.

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Could DNA testing help the most seriously affected Covid-19 patients?

April 28, 2020 – Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The disease was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, the capital of China’s Hubei province,

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Covid-19: Be careful with chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine

March 25, 2020 – The Covid-19 pandemic keeps the word abreast. Drastic measures have been and are being taken worldwide by governments, hospitals, healthcare  care providers, and retiring homes in attempts to halt the spreading of Covid-19. Recently, there have been publications by Chinese clinical researchers in the Journal Cell Research and the International Journal of Antimicrob Agents indicating that both,

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  • Study reveals restoration of retinal and visual function following gene therapy October 19, 2020
    A breakthrough study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, results in the restoration of retinal and visual functions of mice models suffering from inherited retinal disease.
  • Scientists map the human proteome October 19, 2020
    Twenty years after the release of the human genome, the genetic "blueprint" of human life, an international research team, including the University of British Columbia's Chris Overall, has now mapped the first draft sequence of the human proteome.
  • The line of succession in neuron function October 19, 2020
    A specific region of messenger RNAs, the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), plays an important role for cells to function properly. During embryonic development, 3'UTRs in hundreds of RNAs lengthen exclusively in neurons, which is crucial for the cells of the brain to function properly. The lab of Valérie Hilgers at the Max Planck Institute of […]
  • Pinpointing the 'silent' mutations that gave the coronavirus an evolutionary edge October 16, 2020
    We know that the coronavirus behind the COVID-19 crisis lived harmlessly in bats and other wildlife before it jumped the species barrier and spilled over to humans.
  • Transposons could be rewiring our brains October 16, 2020
    A new study by neuroscientists at the University of Oxford shows that mobile genetic elements that were active in the genomes of our ancestors could be closely linked to important functions in our brain and might help diversify our behavior, cognition and emotions.
  • Asymmetric optical camouflage: Tuneable reflective color accompanied by optical Janus effect October 20, 2020
    Deliverying viewing-direction sensitive information display across single sheet of transreflective window is introduced. Based on the experimental verification of theoretical modelling, scientists in Republic of Korea invented colour tuneable optical device that displays different colours and messages depending on viewing direction which is completely new and exotic optical phenomenon. A step further, they realized asymmetric […]
  • Researchers at the forefront of developing machine learning methods for chemical discovery October 20, 2020
    Prof. Alexandre Tkatchenko and his research team at the University of Luxembourg have been awarded grants totalling 500,000 euros to conduct research in the emerging field of machine learning methods for chemical discoveries.
  • COVID-19: Distancing and masks are not enough October 20, 2020
    Decades-old data is being used to describe the propagation of tiny droplets. Now a fluid dynamics team has developed new models: Masks and distancing are good, but not enough. Even with a mask, infectious droplets can be transmitted over several meters and remain in the air longer than previously thought.
  • Oncotarget: Inhibition of HAS2 and hyaluronic acid production by 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in breast October 20, 2020
    Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 30 reported that genomic profiling of murine mammary tumor cells with differential VDR expression identified 35 transcripts that were altered by the 1,25D3-VDR complex including Hyaluronan Synthase-2.
  • US adults' likelihood of accepting COVID-19 vaccination October 20, 2020
    In this survey study of U.S. adults, vaccine-related attributes and political characteristics were associated with self-reported preferences for choosing a hypothetical COVID-19 vaccine and self- reported willingness to receive vaccination. These results may help inform public health campaigns to address vaccine hesitancy when a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available.
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