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Is laziness a personal choice or a genetic trait?

November 02, 2019 – Is laziness a choice or genetic trait? At the age where genetics seems to explain everything, it is certainly interessant to learn that a seemingly personal choice such as laziness as such may loom somewhere in your genetic outfit. Perhaps, you can not escape your laziness behaviour,

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Hidden secrets in African genomes revealed by large scale sequencing

October 20, 2019 – Sequencing African genomes yields new data resource with broad applicability. By collaborating globally in a new, large-scale effort, researchers have made strong progress in sequencing genomes from regions and countries across Africa. These findings will enable more broadly representative and relevant studies ranging from basic through clinical genetics.

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Black people with natural blonde hair – Everything is possible in genetics

August 07, 2019 – Blonde hair is a rare human phenotype found almost exclusively in Europe and Oceania. Human pigmentation varies considerably within and among populations and is a function of both variation in exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and the type and quantity of melanin produced in melanocytes and keratinocytes.

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Chinese arrhythmia in traditional medicine

May 04, 2018 – All natural is healthy. This is a common belief for many, particularly when shopping for alternative medicines and dietary supplements. For many, however, the contrary might be fatally true.

As a point in case, new research shows, that substances in Traditional Chinese Medicine  (TCM) can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia. 

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Placebo: A veritable treatment option

February 11, 2018 – Long after cancer treatment ends, many patients continue to deal with one particular symptom that refuses to go away: fatigue. In a new study, researchers have found that the power of placebos, even when fully disclosed to patients, might be harnessed to reduce fatigue in cancer survivors.

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Chocolate and the sweet taste receptor gene TAS1R2

January 31, 2018 – Chocolate and the sweet taste receptor gene TAS1R2 may make the life of some obese children and adolescents rather difficult in that genetic variations in TAS1R2 appear related to chocolate powder and dietary fiber intake in these young individuals.

This comes out of a study by a research team at the Faculty of Medicine,

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Ashkenazi Jewish Women: Little-known Gene Mutations May Boost Breast Cancer Risk

July 27, 2017 – Jewish women of Ashkenazi descent may be at risk for additional genetic mutations that increase their risk of breast cancer, according to a new study just published in JAMA Oncology. Researchers from University of Washington in Seattle found that around 4 percent of Ashkenazi Jewish women without well-known founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have other mutations that may increase their risk for breast cancer.

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Genetic Biomarker Tied to Suicide Risk in Schizophrenia

 July 18, 2017 – According to a new study just published in the Journal of  Psychiatric Research, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs300774, which previously had been identified as a marker for suicide in people with bipolar disorder (BD), also predicts suicide attempts in people with schizophrenia (SCZ) or schizoaffective disorder (SAD).

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Genetic Study Strengthens Causal Role of BMI in Heart Disease

July 07, 2017 – A new study analyzing genetic mutations predisposing to increased body-mass index (BMI) provides strong evidence that higher BMI plays a causal role in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease (CHD). The study results strongly suggest that BMI is causally related to increased risk of developing diabetes,

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Genetic background of insomnia: At least partially

June 20, 2017 – Insomnia is one of the most common complaint people have about their health. In contrast to common belief and often assumed by the affected sufferers, however, insomnia seems not to be just all in the patients head. A large genome wide association study (GWAS),

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  • Researchers identify new gene mutation in familial thyroid cancers November 20, 2019
    Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine identified a new gene mutation that may cause a type of familial thyroid cancer. Dr. Darrin Bann, an otolaryngology resident at the College of Medicine and lead author of the study, said that this mutation is the first and only mutation associated with familial thyroid cancer to be […]
  • Researchers develop new database of druggable fusion targets November 20, 2019
    When sections from two separate genes merge due to various factors, such as translocation or splicing, the hybrid that is formed is called a gene fusion. In recent years, it has been discovered that these fusion events play a vital role in the development of cancers and other complex diseases. However, there are very few […]
  • Early results of CRISPR gene-editing treatment shows promise in first human trials November 20, 2019
    Officials from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and CRISPR Therapeutics have announced that preliminary results from testing CRISPR gene-editing treatment in human patients with blood disorders show promise thus far. The joint project between the two firms is taking place at one location in Europe and another in the United States. The results have been posted on the […]
  • Whole-genome sequencing analysis to find more exact biomarkers November 20, 2019
    A new study from Uppsala University shows that whole-genome sequencing increases the precision of genetic studies, which in turn can improve our understanding of how to use biomarkers to discover disease. The results are published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports.
  • Complex organ models grown in the lab November 19, 2019
    Scientists at the University of Würzburg have successfully produced human tissues from stem cells. They have a complexity similar to that of normal tissue and are far superior to previous structures.
  • Outback telescope captures Milky Way center, discovers remnants of dead stars November 20, 2019
    A radio telescope in the Western Australian outback has captured a spectacular new view of the centre of the galaxy in which we live, the Milky Way.The image from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope shows what our galaxy would look like if human eyes could see radio waves.
  • Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish November 20, 2019
    Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.
  • Non-invasive microscopy detects activation state and distinguishes between cell types November 20, 2019
    Most analytical methods in biology require invasive procedures to analyze samples, which leads to irreversible changes or even their destruction. Here, researchers from Osaka University develop a non-invasive, label-free optical approach along with statistical tools to reveal immune cell type, cell activation state, and single cell heterogeneity.
  • Living in ethnic enclaves may improve pregnancy outcomes for Asian/Pacific islanders November 20, 2019
    Among Asian/Pacific Islander women living in the United States, those who reside in ethnic enclaves--areas with a high concentration of residents of a similar ancestry--are less likely to have pregnancy or birth complications than those living in other areas, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.
  • Study: Young children can learn math skills from intelligent virtual characters November 20, 2019
    A new study examined whether young children's verbal engagement with an onscreen interactive media character could boost their math skills. The study concluded that children's parasocial (that is, one-sided) emotional relationships with the intelligent character and their parasocial interactions (in this case, talking about math with the character) led to quicker, more accurate math responses […]
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