Blog Archives

Abdominal aortic aneurysm: Genetic scoring can identify more men at risk

May 07, 2020 – Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a localized enlargement of the abdominal aorta such that the diameter is greater than 3 cm or more than 50% larger than normal. AAAs usually cause no symptoms, except during rupture. 

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Klotho’s role in some patients with Alzheimer’s disease revealed?

April 24, 2020 – The klotho gene is named after the fanciful Greek goddess of destiny Clotho who turns the string of life known to be related with longer life and improved cognizance. In modern biology, allelic variants of the klotho gene in fact have been associated with long life span.

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Soccer Headers Might Be More Risky for APOE4 Genotype Carriers

February 01, 2020 – Soccer headers might be more risky for APOE4 genotype carriers – this is the headline of a very recent Reuters Health article appearing in Medscape. Thus, soccer players with apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) genotype may want to limit how many headers they do,

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Is laziness a personal choice or a genetic trait?

November 02, 2019 – Is laziness a choice or genetic trait? At the age where genetics seems to explain everything, it is certainly interessant to learn that a seemingly personal choice such as laziness as such may loom somewhere in your genetic outfit. Perhaps, you can not escape your laziness behaviour,

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Hidden secrets in African genomes revealed by large scale sequencing

October 20, 2019 – Sequencing African genomes yields new data resource with broad applicability. By collaborating globally in a new, large-scale effort, researchers have made strong progress in sequencing genomes from regions and countries across Africa. These findings will enable more broadly representative and relevant studies ranging from basic through clinical genetics.

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Black people with natural blonde hair – Everything is possible in genetics

August 07, 2019 – Blonde hair is a rare human phenotype found almost exclusively in Europe and Oceania. Human pigmentation varies considerably within and among populations and is a function of both variation in exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and the type and quantity of melanin produced in melanocytes and keratinocytes.

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Chinese arrhythmia in traditional medicine

May 04, 2018 – All natural is healthy. This is a common belief for many, particularly when shopping for alternative medicines and dietary supplements. For many, however, the contrary might be fatally true.

As a point in case, new research shows, that substances in Traditional Chinese Medicine  (TCM) can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia. 

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Placebo: A veritable treatment option

February 11, 2018 – Long after cancer treatment ends, many patients continue to deal with one particular symptom that refuses to go away: fatigue. In a new study, researchers have found that the power of placebos, even when fully disclosed to patients, might be harnessed to reduce fatigue in cancer survivors.

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Chocolate and the sweet taste receptor gene TAS1R2

January 31, 2018 – Chocolate and the sweet taste receptor gene TAS1R2 may make the life of some obese children and adolescents rather difficult in that genetic variations in TAS1R2 appear related to chocolate powder and dietary fiber intake in these young individuals.

This comes out of a study by a research team at the Faculty of Medicine,

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Ashkenazi Jewish Women: Little-known Gene Mutations May Boost Breast Cancer Risk

July 27, 2017 – Jewish women of Ashkenazi descent may be at risk for additional genetic mutations that increase their risk of breast cancer, according to a new study just published in JAMA Oncology. Researchers from University of Washington in Seattle found that around 4 percent of Ashkenazi Jewish women without well-known founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have other mutations that may increase their risk for breast cancer.

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  • Researchers develop new approach to study the genetics of human disease July 7, 2020
    Many heritable immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and blood-cell related traits derive from critical proteins not being made or not functioning correctly. But exactly how a person's genes, the regulation of these genes and how the resulting proteins interact to cause disease is not widely understood.
  • Common inherited genetic variant identified as frequent cause of deafness in adults July 6, 2020
    A common inherited genetic variant is a frequent cause of deafness in adults, meaning that many thousands of people are potentially at risk, reveals research published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics.
  • Rsearchers create an analytic tool that opens a new frontier of cancer discovery July 6, 2020
    Gene coding regions constitute 2% of the human genome. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a computational tool to identify alterations that drive tumor formation in the remaining 98% of the genome. The method will aid discovery of oncogenes and advances in precision medicine for children and adults with cancer.
  • Discovery of new disease-susceptibility gene for steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome July 3, 2020
    An international research collaboration, including Professor Iijima Kazumoto et al. (of the Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) has revealed that NPHS1 is a disease-susceptibility gene for steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome in children. The NPHS1 gene encodes nephrin, a component protein for the renal glomerulus slit diaphragm, which prevents protein from being passed […]
  • How digital tools can advance quality and equity in genomic medicine July 3, 2020
    The pandemic has forced health care providers to find new ways to connect with patients through screens. For genetic specialists, who provide patients and families with genetic testing for conditions linked to DNA, connecting with patients is an important part of helping them make informed medical decisions.
  • Mental health benefits of parks dimmed by safety concerns July 7, 2020
    No matter how close parks are to home, perceptions of park-centered crime may keep New Yorkers from using them.
  • Measuring tape is a critical tool for following Zika virus-exposed children July 7, 2020
    A simple measuring tape could be the key to identifying which children could developneurological and developmental abnormalities from Zika virus exposure during gestation.This is according to an invited commentary published July 7 in JAMA Network Open andwritten by Sarah Mulkey, M.D., Ph.D., prenatal-neonatal neurologist in the Division ofPrenatal Pediatrics at Children's National Hospital.
  • Repurposing public health systems to decode COVID-19 July 7, 2020
    Research published in the journal Microbial Genomics describes how national surveillance systems can be linked with the UK Biobank. This pooled data could then be used to understand how genetics and other epidemiological factors impact risk of developing severe infection.
  • Microplastic pollution harms lobster larvae, study finds July 7, 2020
    Microplastic fiber pollution in the ocean impacts larval lobsters at each stage of their development, according to new research. A study published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin reports that the fibers affect the animals' feeding and respiration, and they could even prevent some larvae from reaching adulthood.
  • Why it's no last orders for the Tequila bat July 6, 2020
    Scientists studying the 'near threatened' tequila bat, best known for its role in pollinating the Blue Agave plant from which the drink of the same name is made from, have analysed its DNA to help inform conservationists on managing their populations. The findings are published in Global Ecology and Conservation.
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