Blog Archives

Hidden secrets in African genomes revealed by large scale sequencing

October 20, 2019 – Sequencing African genomes yields new data resource with broad applicability. By collaborating globally in a new, large-scale effort, researchers have made strong progress in sequencing genomes from regions and countries across Africa. These findings will enable more broadly representative and relevant studies ranging from basic through clinical genetics.

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Risk loci for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

August 01, 2019 – Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, or other threats on a person’s life. Symptoms may include disturbing thoughts,

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DNMT3B gene variant influences nicotine dependence

December 09, 2017 – Newest research has revealed that a DNMT3B gene variant influences nicotine dependence identified in people of European (Caucasian) descent and African-American decent as well.

Thus, a DNA variant, located in the DNMT3B gene and commonly found in people of European (Caucasian) and African-American descent,

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Gene expression and ethnicity: Does it matter?

December 05, 2017 – We are entering the age of precision medicine, in which diagnosis and therapy decisions for each patient will be based on detailed genetic and molecular fingerprints. Unfortunately, much of the revolutionary work that underpins precision medicine has been conducted on populations of European (Caucasian) descent,

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Cancer is not like cancer: Ethnic background matters

November 24, 2017 – New research indicates that one-size treatment for one form of blood cancer likely does not fit all, particularly when it comes to ethnic differences of patients.  Thus, African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma,

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Ashkenazi Jewish Women: Little-known Gene Mutations May Boost Breast Cancer Risk

July 27, 2017 – Jewish women of Ashkenazi descent may be at risk for additional genetic mutations that increase their risk of breast cancer, according to a new study just published in JAMA Oncology. Researchers from University of Washington in Seattle found that around 4 percent of Ashkenazi Jewish women without well-known founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have other mutations that may increase their risk for breast cancer.

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  • Genetically engineered animals offer fresh hope to heart valve patients December 6, 2019
    Scientists have cloned a genetically engineered bull which they hope will help heart valve transplant patients lead better quality lives and benefit people with red meat allergies.
  • 'Junk DNA' affects inherited cancer risk December 6, 2019
    A person's risk of developing cancer is affected by genetic variations in regions of DNA that don't code for proteins, previously dismissed as 'junk DNA', according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer today.
  • Gene network sparks future autism treatment December 5, 2019
    A mutated gene found in people with intellectual disabilities that could be targeted for treatment has been identified by an international team including University of Queensland researchers.
  • Tick, tock: How stress speeds up your chromosomes' aging clock December 5, 2019
    Ageing is an inevitability for all living organisms, and although we still don't know exactly why our bodies gradually grow ever more decrepit, we are starting to grasp how it happens.
  • Genome testing for siblings of kids with autism may detect ASD before symptoms appear December 5, 2019
    One of the key priorities of interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is starting early, with some evidence showing infants as young as seven months old could benefit. Yet, most children in North America aren't diagnosed with ASD until they're over four years of age. New research led by The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) […]
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