Blog Archives

Febuxostat (Uloric) and its problem with cardiovascular mortality

January 16, 2109 – Despite drug safety problems of cardiovascular mortality with Febuxostat (Uloric), the benefits might still be seen to outweigh risks for selected gout patients. This notion may become more and disputed over time, however, for obvious reasons.

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New treatments for multiple sclerosis and inflammatory arthritis approved

March 31, 2019 – The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just approved  drugs for two rather problematic neurological conditions, namely multiple sclerosis (i.e., Cladribine (Mavenclad)) and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (i.e., Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia)), offering patients with these conditions urgently need additional therapy options. FDA approves new oral treatment for multiple sclerosis

The FDA approved Cladribine (Mavenclad) tablets to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS ) in adults,

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Abilify MyCite, the first digital pill. Where does all that silicone go?

November 16, 2017 – The American Food & Drug Administration (FDA) just approved Ability MyCite,  a pill with a sensor that digitally tracks if patients have ingested their medication. This is a very first in its class at the new age of digital health.

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The first gene therapy FDA approved in the US

September 3, 2017 – For a very first time, the American Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a gene therapy for the United States (US) in that it approved CAR T-cell therapy to treat certain children and young adults with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-cell ALL).

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Axicabtagene Ciloleucel (Yescarta) gene therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

October 19, 2017 – The American  Food & Drug Administration (FDA) just approved Axicabtagene Ciloleucel (Yescarta), a cell-based gene therapy, to treat adult patients with certain types of large B-cell lymphoma who have not responded to or who have relapsed after at least two other kinds of treatment.

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Enasidenib (Idhifa): Targeted treatment for relapsed or refractory AML

August 02, 2017 – This is another cornerstone in the fight against acute myeloid leukemia (AML): The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just approved Enasidenib (Idhifa) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have a specific genetic mutation.

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Brodalumab (Siliq) with a fatal touch: New psoriasis drug approved

February 16, 2017 – The American Food & Drug Administration (FDA) just approved Brodalumab (Siliq) to treat adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Brodalumab (Siliq) is administered as an injection. Brodalumab (Siliq) is intended for patients who are candidates for systemic therapy (treatment using substances that travel through the bloodstream,

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The opioid epidemic: Is there a never ending sad story?

September 01, 2016 – This is what we learned this morning and sadly, the issue of opioids use in the population along with its fatal outcomes seems never to stop.  The American Food & Drug Asministation (FDA) requires, according to a press release this morning,

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FDA warns about the risk of HBV reactivation in patients treated with DAA for HCV-infection

October 05, 2016 – Here, we make available to our readers a Drug Safety Communication by the American Food & Drug Administration (FDA), where FDA warns about the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in some patients treated with direct-acting antivirals (DAA) for hepatitis hepatitis-c-iC virus (HCV)-infection.

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Necitumumab (Portrazza) approved for the treatment of advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

November 28, 2015 – The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just approved Necitumumab (Portrazza) in combination with two forms of chemotherapy to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received medication specifically for treating their advanced lung cancer.

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  • Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals details about individual cells in pancreatic tumors September 30, 2020
    Led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and by HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute, an international team of researchers have described in detail the individual cells that comprise the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, a critical step in devising new treatment options for patients with this aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease.
  • Study: Neanderthal genes are a liability for COVID patients September 30, 2020
    Scientists say genes that some people have inherited from their Neanderthal ancestors may increase their likelihood of suffering severe forms of COVID-19.
  • Concealed cardiomyopathies revealed in cardiac arrest survivors September 30, 2020
    Centenary Institute researchers have discovered that genetic testing can identify "concealed cardiomyopathies" in nearly a quarter of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survivors who seem to have a normal heart.
  • Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain September 29, 2020
    Some people are at higher risk of developing obesity because they possess genetic variants that affect how the brain processes sensory information and regulates feeding and behavior. The findings from scientists at the University of Copenhagen support a growing body of evidence that obesity is a disease whose roots are in the brain.
  • Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk September 29, 2020
    A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found.
  • Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals details about individual cells in pancreatic tumors September 30, 2020
    Led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and by HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute, an international team of researchers have described in detail the individual cells that comprise the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, a critical step in devising new treatment options for patients with this aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease. […]
  • Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities September 30, 2020
    A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification.
  • Videos most effective in communicating with parents about secondhand smoke risks September 30, 2020
    The best way to communicate with parent smokers about the risks of secondhand smoke to their children is to use videos depicting the risks, as well as solutions to reduce those risks.
  • Antipsychotics for treating adult depression linked with higher mortality September 30, 2020
    Rutgers researchers, together with colleagues at Columbia University, have reported an increased mortality risk in adults with depression who initiated augmentation with newer antipsychotic medications compared to a control group that initiated augmentation with a second antidepressant.
  • Is it time to reframe the assisted dying debate? September 30, 2020
    Several articles published by The BMJ today explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives.
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