Blog Archives

ZRANB3 in African Populations: New Type 2 Diabetes risk locus identified

August 03, 2019 – Africa is considered the original cradle of all humanity, to which all humans can trace their genetic origin. This may be very interesting in the context of diseases that are due to genetic predispositions both in todays African populations and in all the populations descendant of African origin worldwide.

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Risk of Bullous Pemphigoid with Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

August 12, 2018 – Findings from a retrospective case-control study were published online August 8, 2018, in JAMA Dermatology indicate that the use of certain dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor drugs are associated with a small but significantly elevated risk for developing bullous pemphigoid,

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Genetic Study Strengthens Causal Role of BMI in Heart Disease

July 07, 2017 – A new study analyzing genetic mutations predisposing to increased body-mass index (BMI) provides strong evidence that higher BMI plays a causal role in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease (CHD). The study results strongly suggest that BMI is causally related to increased risk of developing diabetes,

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Lixisenatide (Adlyxin) approved to treat type 2 diabetes

August 01, 2016 – Type 2 diabetes affects more than 29 million people and accounts for more than 90 percent of diabetes cases diagnosed in the United States. Over time, high blood sugar levels can increase the risk for serious complications, including heart disease, blindness and nerve and kidney damage.

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Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors in Type-2 Diabetes: Risk of acute kidney injury

June 16, 2016 – The sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is a protein that is encoded by the SLC5A2 gene. SGLT2 is one member of a larger family of sodium-glucose cotransporters which are sodium-dependent glucose transport proteins. SGLT2 is the major cotransporter involved in glucose reabsorption in the kidney. 

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SGLT2 inhibitors and diabetic ketoacidosis: PRAC makes recommendations to minimise risk to patients

February 14, 2016 – Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes caused by low insulin levels. Rare cases of this condition, including life-threatening ones, have occurred in patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes and a number of these cases have been atypical,

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SGLT2 Inhibitors and ketoacidosis: Warnings about too much acid in the blood and serious urinary tract infections included in new drug labels

December 5, 2015 – A safety review by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has resulted in the addition of specific warnings to the drug labels of a specific class of type 2 diabetes medicines called sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors about the risks of too much acid in the blood and of serious urinary tract infections.

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Theragenomic medicine and social habits: A regularly taken glass of wine may improve cardiometabolic risks in some patients with type 2 diabetes

October 28, 2015 – According to a  small prospective and randomized clinical study, just published online in the Annals of Internal Medicine, a regularly taken glass of wine with dinner may improve lipid and glycemic control profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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Type 2 Diabetes: Risk for bone fracture and decreased bone mineral density under canagliflozin therapy

 September 12, 2015 – Drug Safety Information: The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  has just strengthened the warning for the type 2 diabetes medicines containing  canagliflozin as active ingredient, i.e. Invokana and Invokamet, related to the increased risk of bone fractures, and added new information about decreased bone mineral density in afflicted patients.

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Drug Safety Communication: DPP-4 inhibitors for Type 2-Diabetes may cause severe joint pain

August 29, 2015 – This may after all not be so good news for Type 2-Diabetes patients on DPP-4 inhibitor medications. The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning that the type 2 diabetes medicines containing the pharmacologically active ingredients (PAI) sitagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin may cause joint pain that can be severe and disabling.  

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  • New type of taste cell discovered in taste buds August 13, 2020
    Our mouths may be home to a newly discovered set of multi-tasking taste cells that—unlike most known taste cells, which detect individual tastes—are capable of detecting sour, sweet, bitter and umami stimuli. A research team led by Kathryn Medler at the University at Buffalo reports this discovery in a study published 13th August in PLOS […]
  • Researchers discover genetic link to predict positive response to immunotherapy in patient August 13, 2020
    A Singapore team led by clinician-scientists and researchers from the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) discovered a genetic link to better predict treatment response for relapsed/refractory patients with natural-killer T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL), a highly aggressive form of blood cancer. The team performed whole-genome sequencing, to identify mutation in PD-L1 gene as a reliable biomarker to […]
  • Evolution and everyday stress have led to disproportionate suffering among women August 13, 2020
    We're 100% behind knowledge-based research, but sometimes you really do have to question evolution!
  • A cancer mystery more than 40 years old is solved thanks to epigenetics August 12, 2020
    Before the first oncogene mutations were discovered in human cancer in the early 1980s, the 1970s provided the first data suggesting alterations in the genetic material of tumors. In this context, the prestigious journal Nature published in 1975 the existence of a specific alteration in the transformed cell: an RNA responsible for carrying an amino […]
  • Combining genetic information with EMRs to pinpoint childhood epilepsies August 11, 2020
    A team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) affiliated with the CHOP Epilepsy Neurogenetics Initiative (ENGIN) further bridged the gap between genomic information and clinical outcome data by systematically linking genetic information with electronic medical records, focusing on how genetic neurological disorders in children develop over time. The findings were published today in […]
  • Employers reject transgender people August 13, 2020
    Employers in Sweden more often reject job applications from transgender people -- especially in male-dominated occupations. Moreover, transgender people face discrimination from two different grounds for discrimination. This is according to a study from Linköping University that was recently published in the journal Labour Economics.
  • How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA August 13, 2020
    Scientists at EPFL have demonstrated the mechanism that allows cells to fight off viral DNA without triggering an immune response against their own genetic material.
  • Global deaths due to smokeless tobacco are up by a third, according to new study August 13, 2020
    The number of deaths globally due to smokeless tobacco has gone up by a third in 7 years to an estimated 350,000 people, a new study suggests.
  • A watershed moment for US water quality August 13, 2020
    A new federal rule that determines how the Clean Water Act is implemented leaves millions of miles of streams and acres of wetlands unprotected based on selective interpretation of case law and a distortion of scientific evidence, researchers say in a new publication.
  • Study: Medical marijuana associated with fewer hospitalizations for individuals with SCD August 13, 2020
    Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) who receive medical marijuana to treat pain may require fewer visits to the hospital, according to a new study in Blood Advances. Adults with SCD who requested and obtained medical marijuana were admitted to the hospital less frequently than those who did not obtain it.
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