Blog Archives

Study looks at genetic background of healthy people who develop severe Covid-19 illness

June 13, 2020 – To help disentangle the secrets of Covid-19 disease, researchers are sequencing the DNA of young grown-ups and children who suffer from extreme Covid-19 disease ailments in spite of having no hidden clinical issues. The scientists are searching for hereditary genetic risk factors that could put certain people at high danger of getting seriously sick from the novel coronavirus,

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Diagnoses for children with rare genetic diseases by 3-D facial scans

June 07, 2020 – Most children with rare genetic diseases spend years undergoing medical tests and waiting for a diagnosis—a long, exhausting process that takes its toll on children and their families. Almost half of these children never get a definitive diagnosis.

In a new and exciting development,

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , ,

Host factors may influence Covid-19 severity more than viral genetic variation

May 22, 2020 – Host factors (i.e., disease phenotypes and/or predispositions) instead of viral genetic variation seem to impact more on sickness severity among Covid-19 patients, as indicated by an investigation from China. Scientists in Shanghai analyzed clinical, atomic, and immunological information from in excess of 300 individuals with affirmed Covid-19.

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Abdominal aortic aneurysm: Genetic scoring can identify more men at risk

May 07, 2020 – Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a localized enlargement of the abdominal aorta such that the diameter is greater than 3 cm or more than 50% larger than normal. AAAs usually cause no symptoms, except during rupture. 

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Besides the now approved remdesivir: Emerging options to treat Covid-19

May 03, 2020 –  The world is desperate in the search for a treatment or better yet a vaccine in the Covid-19 pandemic. Slowly, there are some options emerging at least for the treatment of seriously ill Covid-19 patients. First of all,  the American Food and Drug Administration just issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the investigational antiviral drug remdesivir for the treatment of suspected or laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in adults and children hospitalized with severe disease.

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Could DNA testing help the most seriously affected Covid-19 patients?

April 28, 2020 – Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The disease was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, the capital of China’s Hubei province,

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Klotho’s role in some patients with Alzheimer’s disease revealed?

April 24, 2020 – The klotho gene is named after the fanciful Greek goddess of destiny Clotho who turns the string of life known to be related with longer life and improved cognizance. In modern biology, allelic variants of the klotho gene in fact have been associated with long life span.

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

First therapy for children with debilitating NF-1 approved in the USA

April 12, 2020 – The human genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is a complex multi-system disorder caused by the mutation of a gene  (NF1 gene) on chromosome 17 that is responsible for production of a protein called neurofibromin which is needed for normal function in many human cell types.

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Inherited mutation in ELP1 predisposes children to medulloblastoma

April 03, 2020 – Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Medulloblastomas are invasive, rapidly growing tumors that, unlike most brain tumors, spread through the cerebrospinal fluid and frequently metastasize to different locations along the surface of the brain and spinal cord. 

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Are Asians at higher genetic risk of serious adverse events to common medications?

March 10, 2020 – A widespread assumption is, the people of Asian descent are more prone to serious, sometimes deadly adverse drug reactions, even when taking rather common medications prescribed for gout through to depression. In the ages of genetics and precision medicine, the question then comes up if Asian people could be at such heightened risk because of underlying particular genetic factors.

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

thasso: conditions

thasso: newest tweets

thasso: recent comments

View my Flipboard Magazine.

thasso: categories

thasso: archives

thasso: simple chat

You must be a registered user to participate in this chat.

  • New type of taste cell discovered in taste buds August 13, 2020
    Our mouths may be home to a newly discovered set of multi-tasking taste cells that—unlike most known taste cells, which detect individual tastes—are capable of detecting sour, sweet, bitter and umami stimuli. A research team led by Kathryn Medler at the University at Buffalo reports this discovery in a study published 13th August in PLOS […]
  • Researchers discover genetic link to predict positive response to immunotherapy in patient August 13, 2020
    A Singapore team led by clinician-scientists and researchers from the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) discovered a genetic link to better predict treatment response for relapsed/refractory patients with natural-killer T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL), a highly aggressive form of blood cancer. The team performed whole-genome sequencing, to identify mutation in PD-L1 gene as a reliable biomarker to […]
  • Evolution and everyday stress have led to disproportionate suffering among women August 13, 2020
    We're 100% behind knowledge-based research, but sometimes you really do have to question evolution!
  • A cancer mystery more than 40 years old is solved thanks to epigenetics August 12, 2020
    Before the first oncogene mutations were discovered in human cancer in the early 1980s, the 1970s provided the first data suggesting alterations in the genetic material of tumors. In this context, the prestigious journal Nature published in 1975 the existence of a specific alteration in the transformed cell: an RNA responsible for carrying an amino […]
  • Combining genetic information with EMRs to pinpoint childhood epilepsies August 11, 2020
    A team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) affiliated with the CHOP Epilepsy Neurogenetics Initiative (ENGIN) further bridged the gap between genomic information and clinical outcome data by systematically linking genetic information with electronic medical records, focusing on how genetic neurological disorders in children develop over time. The findings were published today in […]
  • Employers reject transgender people August 13, 2020
    Employers in Sweden more often reject job applications from transgender people -- especially in male-dominated occupations. Moreover, transgender people face discrimination from two different grounds for discrimination. This is according to a study from Linköping University that was recently published in the journal Labour Economics.
  • How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA August 13, 2020
    Scientists at EPFL have demonstrated the mechanism that allows cells to fight off viral DNA without triggering an immune response against their own genetic material.
  • Global deaths due to smokeless tobacco are up by a third, according to new study August 13, 2020
    The number of deaths globally due to smokeless tobacco has gone up by a third in 7 years to an estimated 350,000 people, a new study suggests.
  • A watershed moment for US water quality August 13, 2020
    A new federal rule that determines how the Clean Water Act is implemented leaves millions of miles of streams and acres of wetlands unprotected based on selective interpretation of case law and a distortion of scientific evidence, researchers say in a new publication.
  • Study: Medical marijuana associated with fewer hospitalizations for individuals with SCD August 13, 2020
    Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) who receive medical marijuana to treat pain may require fewer visits to the hospital, according to a new study in Blood Advances. Adults with SCD who requested and obtained medical marijuana were admitted to the hospital less frequently than those who did not obtain it.
Top