Wonder-Erect Male Pills: No wonder they contain hidden drug ingredient vardenafil

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Wonder-Erect Pills: The male dream?

January 21, 2016 –  This is a never ending story. The present notification by the The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is once more to inform the public of a growing trend of dietary supplements or conventional foods with hidden drugs and chemicals. These products are typically promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, and body building and are often represented as being “all natural.” FDA is unable to test and identify all products marketed as dietary supplements that have potentially harmful hidden ingredients. Generally, consumers should exercise caution before purchasing any product in the above categories.

Here, in this particular case, FDA is advising consumers not to purchase or use Wonder-Erect Male Pills, a product promoted and sold for sexual enhancement on various websites and possible in some retail stores. Of course, announced of being a 100% herbal supplement and all natural.

In dire contrast, FDA laboratory analysis confirmed that Wonder-Erect Male Pills contain vardenafil. Vardenafil is the active ingredient in the FDA-approved prescription drug Levitra, used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). Vardenafil is a PDE5 inhibitor.  Besides as Levitra, it is sold under the trade names Staxyn in India and Vivanza in Italy.

This undeclared ingredient may interact with nitrates found in some prescription drugs such as nitroglycerin and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. Men with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or heart disease often take nitrates. Overall, vardenafil comes with a variety of sometimes serious, including fatal, adverse effects.  Thus, as with other PDE5 inhibitors (e.g., Sildenafil (Viagra), Tadalafil (Cialis), etc.) common adverse drug reactions (side-effects) include nausea, abdominal pain, back pain, photosensitivity, abnormal vision, eye pain, facial edemahypotension, palpitation, tachycardiaarthralgiamyalgia, rash, itch, and priapism, a very painful emergency condition that can cause impotence if left untreated. Another, possibly serious, but rare, side-effect with vardenafil is heart attack, and possible deafness (sudden hearing loss) had be added in the past by the FDA to the drug labels of Vardenafil (Levitra) and other PDE5 inhibitors. Health care professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of this product to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

 Consumers and patients alike may please refer to the links below for more information on the topic:

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About the Author
Joseph Gut - thasso Ph.D.; Professor in Pharmacology and Toxicology. Senior expert in theragenomic and personalized medicine and individualized drug safety. Senior expert in pharmaco- and toxicogenetics. Senior expert in human safety of drugs, chemicals, environmental pollutants, and dietary ingredients.

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