Blog Archives

Is laziness a personal choice or a genetic trait?

November 02, 2019 – Is laziness a choice or genetic trait? At the age where genetics seems to explain everything, it is certainly interessant to learn that a seemingly personal choice such as laziness as such may loom somewhere in your genetic outfit. Perhaps, you can not escape your laziness behaviour,

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Black people with natural blonde hair – Everything is possible in genetics

August 07, 2019 – Blonde hair is a rare human phenotype found almost exclusively in Europe and Oceania. Human pigmentation varies considerably within and among populations and is a function of both variation in exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and the type and quantity of melanin produced in melanocytes and keratinocytes.

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Risk loci for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

August 01, 2019 – Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, or other threats on a person’s life. Symptoms may include disturbing thoughts,

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Status of genetics behind male infertility

In recent years,

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Where portrait photos meet genetics and AI

June 13, 2019 – This is simply fascinating stuff. Researchers are testing neural networks that automatically combine portrait photos with genetic and phenotypic patient data in order to obtain definitive diagnosis of hereditary rare diseases, all with the help of artificial intelligence (AI).  

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Lemtrada: Deleterious unwanted effects in some multiple sclerosis patients

19 April 2019 – Alemtuzumab (Lemtrada) is used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Moreover, Alemtuzumab, under the Tradenames of Campt, MabCampath and Campt-1H is on the markets for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL),

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Unlucky women with BIA-ALCL: An update

February 17, 2019 – The unfortunate recognition of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL), a very rare form of a T-cell lymphoma, gains more momentum by the day. This is actually very positive a development, because it helps women who are getting breast implants for whatever reasons to better known associated health risks,

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Pharmacogenomics for infectious diseases in sub-Saharan Africa: Successes and opportunities

August 14, 2016 – The PubMed-article below illustrates how pharmacogenetics and/or pharmacogenomics-guided drug therapy (i.e., theragenomic medicine) has its place and impact on patients and healthcare systems in African countries when it comes to large disease burdens such as in HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis (TB), and malaria.

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  • Researchers identify new gene mutation in familial thyroid cancers November 20, 2019
    Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine identified a new gene mutation that may cause a type of familial thyroid cancer. Dr. Darrin Bann, an otolaryngology resident at the College of Medicine and lead author of the study, said that this mutation is the first and only mutation associated with familial thyroid cancer to be […]
  • Researchers develop new database of druggable fusion targets November 20, 2019
    When sections from two separate genes merge due to various factors, such as translocation or splicing, the hybrid that is formed is called a gene fusion. In recent years, it has been discovered that these fusion events play a vital role in the development of cancers and other complex diseases. However, there are very few […]
  • Early results of CRISPR gene-editing treatment shows promise in first human trials November 20, 2019
    Officials from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and CRISPR Therapeutics have announced that preliminary results from testing CRISPR gene-editing treatment in human patients with blood disorders show promise thus far. The joint project between the two firms is taking place at one location in Europe and another in the United States. The results have been posted on the […]
  • Whole-genome sequencing analysis to find more exact biomarkers November 20, 2019
    A new study from Uppsala University shows that whole-genome sequencing increases the precision of genetic studies, which in turn can improve our understanding of how to use biomarkers to discover disease. The results are published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports.
  • Complex organ models grown in the lab November 19, 2019
    Scientists at the University of Würzburg have successfully produced human tissues from stem cells. They have a complexity similar to that of normal tissue and are far superior to previous structures.
  • Outback telescope captures Milky Way center, discovers remnants of dead stars November 20, 2019
    A radio telescope in the Western Australian outback has captured a spectacular new view of the centre of the galaxy in which we live, the Milky Way.The image from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope shows what our galaxy would look like if human eyes could see radio waves.
  • Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish November 20, 2019
    Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.
  • Non-invasive microscopy detects activation state and distinguishes between cell types November 20, 2019
    Most analytical methods in biology require invasive procedures to analyze samples, which leads to irreversible changes or even their destruction. Here, researchers from Osaka University develop a non-invasive, label-free optical approach along with statistical tools to reveal immune cell type, cell activation state, and single cell heterogeneity.
  • Living in ethnic enclaves may improve pregnancy outcomes for Asian/Pacific islanders November 20, 2019
    Among Asian/Pacific Islander women living in the United States, those who reside in ethnic enclaves--areas with a high concentration of residents of a similar ancestry--are less likely to have pregnancy or birth complications than those living in other areas, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.
  • Study: Young children can learn math skills from intelligent virtual characters November 20, 2019
    A new study examined whether young children's verbal engagement with an onscreen interactive media character could boost their math skills. The study concluded that children's parasocial (that is, one-sided) emotional relationships with the intelligent character and their parasocial interactions (in this case, talking about math with the character) led to quicker, more accurate math responses […]
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