Blog Archives

Olaparib Tablets (Lynparza): For breast cancer with BRCA gene mutation

January 13, 2018 – The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just approved the first treatment for breast cancer with a certain inherited genetic mutation. At first glance, this announcement may be just one in the series of announcements by the FDA on new drug approvals.

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Genetic outfit at work: Rucaparib (Rubraca) for ovarian cancer with deleterious BRCA mutation(s)

February 01, 2017 – This is an announcement by the American Food & Drug Administration (FDA) who announced on December 19, 2016, that it granted accelerated approval to Rucaparib (Rubraca) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. Rucaparib (Rubraca) was approved for women with advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies and whose tumors have a specific gene mutation (deleterious BRCA) as identified by an FDA-approved companion diagnostic test.

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , ,

FDA recommends against use of ovarian cancer screening tests

September 08, 2016 – Ovarian cancer occurs when abnormal cells in or near the ovaries grow and form a malignant (cancerous) tumor. In the United States, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death among women. The National Cancer Institute estimates that in 2016,

Read more ›

Tags: , , , , ,

thasso: conditions

thasso: newest tweets

thasso: recent comments

View my Flipboard Magazine.

thasso: categories

thasso: archives

thasso: simple chat

You must be a registered user to participate in this chat.

  • Concealed cardiomyopathies revealed in cardiac arrest survivors September 30, 2020
    Centenary Institute researchers have discovered that genetic testing can identify "concealed cardiomyopathies" in nearly a quarter of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survivors who seem to have a normal heart.
  • Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain September 29, 2020
    Some people are at higher risk of developing obesity because they possess genetic variants that affect how the brain processes sensory information and regulates feeding and behavior. The findings from scientists at the University of Copenhagen support a growing body of evidence that obesity is a disease whose roots are in the brain.
  • Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk September 29, 2020
    A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found.
  • Cardiac arrhythmias linked to gene mutations September 29, 2020
    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias can be linked to the functional and structural consequences of gene mutations. The study is published in the peer-reviewed journal Bioelectricity.
  • Secret of how fish repair their hearts could help cardiac patients September 29, 2020
    The ability of certain fish to heal damage to their hearts could lead to new treatments for patients who have suffered heart attacks and may also help to unravel how the lifestyle of our parents and grandparents can affect our own heart health.
  • Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals details about individual cells in pancreatic tumors September 30, 2020
    Led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and by HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute, an international team of researchers have described in detail the individual cells that comprise the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, a critical step in devising new treatment options for patients with this aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease. […]
  • Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities September 30, 2020
    A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification.
  • Videos most effective in communicating with parents about secondhand smoke risks September 30, 2020
    The best way to communicate with parent smokers about the risks of secondhand smoke to their children is to use videos depicting the risks, as well as solutions to reduce those risks.
  • Antipsychotics for treating adult depression linked with higher mortality September 30, 2020
    Rutgers researchers, together with colleagues at Columbia University, have reported an increased mortality risk in adults with depression who initiated augmentation with newer antipsychotic medications compared to a control group that initiated augmentation with a second antidepressant.
  • Is it time to reframe the assisted dying debate? September 30, 2020
    Several articles published by The BMJ today explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives.
Top